Dr. Mark Wyatt
Dr. Mark Wyatt Associate Professor
Bio
Education
Technical Areas
Research Interests
Bio

Associate Professor, Department of English

Mark Wyatt is an Associate Professor in the Department of English. Before joining Khalifa University, he was a Senior Lecturer in English Language and Linguistics at the University of Portsmouth (2009-2015), where he remains a Visiting Senior Research Fellow. He has also worked for the University of Leeds, both on a BA TESOL Project in Oman (2002-2008) and as an External Examiner for MA TESOL-related programs (2015-2018).

Education
  • Ph.D., Education, University of Leeds, 2008
  • M.A.,TESOL, University of Edinburgh, 2000
  • Licentiate Diploma in TESOL (LTCL), Trinity College London, 1997
Technical Areas

While at Khalifa University, Dr. Wyatt has taught English Communication 111 and 112 (for freshmen), Introduction to Linguistics (for sophomores and juniors), Engineering Communication (for seniors), and Technical and Scientific Writing (for postgraduates). Previously, he taught a wide range of modules related to teaching methodology (for pre-service and in-service teachers), research methods, and linguistics at the Universities of Leeds and Portsmouth.

Research Interests

Dr. Wyatt’s main research interests include language teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs, teacher cognition, teacher motivation, practitioner research, and in-service language teacher education. He has presented at conferences and published widely in these areas. He has also developed research interests that are specific to the contexts in which he has worked. For example, at the University of Portsmouth, he published articles related to school visits during pre-service teacher education, using the tools of corpus linguistics for researching English vocabulary, engaging undergraduates in language research, and using textual analysis in teaching the history of English. At Khalifa University, he has engaged in collaborative research projects concerning a reading intervention for foundation students, the cognitions of faculty regarding project-based learning, and an innovative approach to an English communication course, which drew on Grice’s maxims in text analysis. An ongoing research project focuses on the challenges students face in learning science and mathematics through English.